The Scottish Standard ‘Rampant Lion’ and the ‘St. Andrews’ Flags

(Taken from the Scottish-at-Heart.com website)

The Lion Rampant…. Royal Flag of Scotland:

Although the national flag of Scotland is the blue and white ‘Saltire’ (aka the St. Andrews Cross flag) there is also a second, quite different, flag which is called the ‘Lion Rampant’.

The ‘Lion Flag’ is often considered the unofficial national flag and referred to as the ‘Royal Flag of Scotland’.

The ‘Royal’ term applies because this flag historically, and legally, belongs to the monarchy (or royalty) – more specifically to a King or Queen of Scotland.

The Scottish Lion Rampant flag today:

Officially (and historically) the ‘Lion’ Flag is only allowed to be flown by a monarch, and today it is traditionally flown at royal residences when the Queen, or now King, is NOT in residence.

According to an Act of Parliament, passed in 1672, it is an offense for any private citizen or corporate body to fly or wave this flag, so they’re not a part of the every-day Scottish scenery.

Unofficially though, it’s often thought of as the ‘Second National Flag of Scotland’ and you’ll generally see hordes of them in the hands of sports fans at national (and international) football and rugby games.

They can also sometimes be seen on Scottish merchandise such as mugs, t-shirts and so on.

Lion Rampant flag at football games

Although this is technically illegal, there doesn’t seem to be any official objections to these displays of patriotism because King George V gave permission for Lion Rampant flags to be waved by the public during his Silver Jubilee celebrations in 1935.

BUT, if anyone wants to fly one from a flagpole or building they do still need to get special permission!


HRH Queen Elizabeth II Leaves Balmoral Castle for the Last Time

by HB Auld, Jr.

The cortege of Queen Elizabeth II departed Balmoral Castle at 4 a.m., CDT, USA, Sunday, September 11, 2022, on its final journey to London, accompanied by her daughter, Princess Anne.

The Queen’s oaken casket was carried by six games keepers from Balmoral Castle’s ballroom to the hearse to begin its six-hour journey on the first day of its trip to London. The Queen had specified that these six beloved games keepers who often accompanied her on hikes through the Highland countryside be her pall bearers for this first leg of her trip. The hearse, draped in the Royal Standard yellow “Rampant Lion” flag of Scotland, began its first 175-mile journey Sunday through Scottish towns and the Highlands countryside to Holyroodhouse palace in Edinburgh. There, it will rest for two days so the Scottish people can pay their respects. It passed through Aberdeen and Dundee, Scotland, on its way to Edinburgh. Traveling south along the A90, it stopped in Dundee at about 2 p.m., Scottish time for a short rest before continuing on to Edinburgh.

First Minister Nicola Sturgeon and other party leaders in Scotland observed the coffin as it went past the Scottish Parliament.

From there it was taken into the Palace of Holyroodhouse, where it remained for the night.

A procession up the High Street and Royal Mile on Monday took her to St Giles’ Cathedral in Edinburgh for a “Service of Thanksgiving,” followed by HRH King Charles III; his younger sister, Princess Anne; and his younger brothers: Prince Andrew, and Prince Edward, all four of whom walked behind their mother’s casket down the Royal Mile to the Cathedral. There is where she will remain for 24 hours, allowing the public to pay tribute.

On Tuesday, the coffin will be flown to London where it will Lie in State at Westminster Hall for four days. Queen Elizabeth II’s funeral will be Monday, September 19, 2022, at Westminster Abbey.