He is Risen!

Happy birthday, Chief Petty Officers

This Sunday, April 1, 2018, US Navy Chief Petty Officers throughout the world will pause to celebrate the 125th anniversary of the establishment of the Chief Petty Officer rate.

Chief Petty Officers trace their heritage to April 1, 1893, and since that date, have been the “backbone of the Navy” and at the forefront of Navy Deckplate Leadership. Since that date, the tradition has been to tell those seeking knowledge, to “Go Ask the Chief.”

Happy birthday to all US Navy Chief Petty Officers everywhere.

 

Good Friday, 2018

Good Friday 2

Today, Good Friday, 2018, we remember the day that Christ was crucified and died for our sins.

 

 

Remember Goliad!

Goliad Execution

Today is another dark day in the history of Texas. The Alamo had fallen just two weeks before and now Goliad fell on Palm Sunday, 1836, and all Texans within were executed.  But as Tara Ross says below, San Jacinto was just around the corner. Read now, Tara’s stirring account of the Battle of Goliad, and REMEMBER GOLIAD!

By Tara Ross

© 2013-2018 by Tara Ross

On this day in 1836, the Goliad Massacre takes place. Most of you have heard “Remember the Alamo!” Did you know that “Remember Goliad!” was another battle cry used by Texans?

The events at Goliad occurred just two short weeks after Texans were defeated at the Alamo.

Colonel James Fannin was then at Goliad, building reinforcements around the presidio there. When the Alamo fell, Fannin received orders from Sam Houston to withdraw. But Fannin was in a bit of a bind. Against orders, he had sent some of his soldiers to help with other expeditions. He awaited their return, and he seemed oblivious to the danger that was so quickly approaching him: Mexican General Jose de Urrea was marching toward his position with 1,000 men.

Fannin did eventually attempt a retreat, but he procrastinated too long—with fatal results.

As Fannin’s men attempted a go, they were met by Urrea and his men. A two-day battle ensued. The Texans took losses, but held their own on the first day. And to their credit, they did not attempt to escape in the middle of the night, when they could have, because they did not want to leave their wounded behind. But the next day, Mexican reinforcements arrived and the Texans were overwhelmed. Fannin surrendered on March 20, on the condition that his men be treated as prisoners of war.

Now Urrea was the one with a problem. He was not authorized to agree to such terms. The Mexican Congress had passed a law requiring that captured Texans be treated like pirates—i.e. they were to be shot. Fannin and his men were marched back to Goliad. Accounts vary, but apparently many of them thought that they would be treated honorably like prisoners of war.

Urrea wrote Mexican General Santa Anna, asking for clemency, but he apparently failed to mention that he’d agreed to Fannin’s terms. Santa Anna wrote back with an order that the Texans be executed. Not trusting Urrea to comply, he then ordered Col. José Nicolás de la Portilla to perform the execution.

Finally, on Palm Sunday, March 27, those Texans who could walk were marched out of Goliad. They were told various stories about where they were going. Less than a mile out, the guards stopped the captives and began firing at close range. Those who were too wounded to march were executed, separately, behind the presidio. Roughly 340 men were massacred that day. A little less than 30 men escaped. A few, such as doctors, were spared because of the services that they could provide.

Fannin was among the last to be shot. He had just a few requests: He did not want to be shot in the face, he wanted his personal belongings to be sent to his family, and he wanted a Christian burial. He was denied every one of these requests.

The Alamo and Goliad were dark days for the Texan effort. But the Battle of San Jacinto was just around the corner! Texans were mere weeks away from earning their independence.

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If you enjoy these history posts, please know that it is important to LIKE, SHARE & COMMENT. This site’s algorithm will weed these posts out of your newsfeed if you do not interact with them. (I don’t make the rules! Just following them.) 😉

Gentle reminder: History posts are copyright © 2013-2018 by Tara Ross. I appreciate it when you use the Facebook “share” feature instead of cutting/pasting.

#TDIH #OTD #AmericanHistory #USHistory #liberty#freedom #ShareTheHistory

 

 

 

Holy Week Celebrations

Today begins Holy Week for Christians around the world.  It culminates next Sunday in the remembrance of the Resurrection of Jesus Christ on the day we celebrate as Easter.

Today is Palm Sunday, the day celebrated one week before Easter as the day that Jesus made his triumphant entry into Jerusalem.  Less than one week later he would be crucified on the following Friday.

Thursday, Christians will celebrate Maundy Thursday, the remembrance of The Last Supper when Jesus ate his last meal with his Disciples in the Upper Room.  It is a Holy Sacrament in many Christian churches, celebrated with the Eucharist of bread and wine, which is a “thanksgiving and praise for the wonderful works of God.”

Friday, Christians remember the crucifiction of Jesus when he died on the cross in a celebration of “Good Friday.”  The Bible says that Jesus was beaten and scourged, then driven through the streets of Jerusalem to Mount Golgotha at Calvary, carrying a cross upon which he was hung until he was dead.  He was buried in a tomb, borrowed from Joseph of Arimathea. The tomb was ordered sealed with a stone and guarded by Roman Centurions.

Also on Friday, Jews around the world begin the celebration of Passover which is a remembrance of the exodus of the Hebrews from slavery in Egypt. The ritual observance of this holiday centers around a special home service called the seder (meaning “order”) and a festive meal; the prohibition of chametz (leaven); and the eating of matzah (an unleavened bread).  On the fifteenth day of Nisan in the Hebrew calendar, Jews gather with family and friends in the evening to read from a book called the haggadah, meaning “telling,” which contains the order of prayers, rituals, readings, and songs for the Passover seder. Today, the holiday is a celebration of freedom and family. (Wikipedia)  

On Sunday, April 1, Christians will celebrate the resurrection of Jesus Christ and His victory over death.  Christians remember that Jesus died for the sins of mankind, that all might have everlasting life in Eternity with God, the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  

 

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A Great Movie!

We went to see the movie, “I Can Only Imagine” this afternoon. I can truthfully say this is the best movie I have seen in years. But they were not kidding when they advised to bring a box of Kleenex. A great, feel-good movie.

My wife commented, “Enjoyed this from the opening scene to the final credits. So nice to watch a movie with a great story line…and they did it without sexual content and/or foul language! Go see it…take a friend…and a box of tissues.”

 

 

Website Updated

Today, I completed a major overhaul and update to my personal site, https://hbauld.com.

This site has needed a facelift for quite awhile.  I am now using the blog site, WordPress, to display my personal blog on the front page and several other pages on the tabs across the top.

Additionally, I added a new design background using the MacGregor tartan.  I am also in the process of changing the Header Banner from a Navy theme to a Scottish theme.  That will happen in the next week or two.

In the meantime, please peruse the new site and leave your comments on the Contact Me tab on the far right of the top or in the Comments Section at the bottom of this post.

Thank you for FOLLOWING this blog.

 

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